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Waders Galore Norfolk Birdwatching Trip


Three days of sunshine and brilliant birds with great company in Norfolk, perfect!

We began at Welney WWT Reserve on the Ouse Washes where within minutes of arriving we were watching three Common Cranes! What a great start to our three days birdwatching trip to Norfolk. Welney was alive with waders and wildfowl and we quickly ran up a great list of birds.

We then headed up to the North Norfolk Coast and spent the next two days birding between Hunstanton and Cley-next-the-Sea. The weather was just perfect, blue sky and sunshine and we sampled some great Norfolk food.

Cley NWT reserve gave us brilliant views of a juvenile Pectoral Sandpiper along with Garganey and a host of waders. But it was Titchwell RSPB that really had the adrenalin pumpimg! The pools were teaming with birds, as always, flocks of Spoonbills and hundreds of waders and wildfowl meant it was difficult to know where to look! We recorded 24 species of waders on the trip!

The sea also produced great birds with numerous Arctic Skuas showing off chasing terns, flocks of Pink footed Geese coming in over head, Common Scoter and Eider and flocks of waders and wildfowl migrating.

Inland we watched Corn Buntings, Yellowhammers and both Red legged and Grey Partridges, enjoyed brilliant views of Green Woodpeckers and Yellow Wagtails.

Marsh Harriers and Hobbys showed us their hunting skills, one Marsh Harrier seen feasting on a recently killed adult Coot!

Birds were everywhere and we soaked up the views in the sunshine. Mammals were a real feature to with ten species seen!

We still have space on our next Norfolk Birdwatching Trip on 28th - 30th September, come along and enjoy wonderful birds in stunning landscapes, with great food!

Here are some images from our latest trip....

Norfolk Cranes Welney
Spot the cranes beyound the cows, scope views were good!

Norfolk Blk t god and ruff Titchwell
Black tailed Godwit and a Ruff

Norfolk Golden Plover Titchwell
Flock of Golden Plover

Norfolk Ruff 1 Titchwell
Juvenile Ruff

Norfolk Lapwing Titchwell
One of our favourite birds - Lapwing

Norfolk Ruff 2 Titchwell
Know what this wader is?

Norfolk Ruff 3 Titchwell
Another Ruff, a large male

Norfolk Ruth Titchwell
Ruth in her new Country Innovation fleece, very nice!

Norfolk Beach watch Titchwell
Brian and Jean get to grips with Skua identification

Norfolk Water Shrew Titchwell
This cute Water Shrew was on the path at RSPB Titchwell

Norfolk Bairds 1 Titchwell
Highlight of the trip - finding this Baird's Sandpiper at RSPB Titchwell photo by Ashley Banwell, many thanks Ashley.

Norfolk Twitch Titchwell
Minutes after we put the news out on the Baird's Sandpiper!

Norfolk Bairds 2 Titchwell
Another pic of our rarity - by Ashley Banwell - a wonderful rarity to find.

We finished our trip by calling in at the RSPB Ouse Wahes reserve and scored an adult White rumped Sandpiper! We were lucky to see it as other birders were leaving when we arrived having missed it. Our Leica telescopes made a real difference this trip picking out great birds that we may other wise have missed!

Also on the reserve we had Spoonbill, 6 Spotted Redshank, dozens of Ruff, Curlew Sandpipers, Greenshanks, 3 Garganey, 3 Marsh Harriers, Kingfisher and scope filling views of Green Woodpecker. A wonderful end to three days of perfect birdwatching!

Do come and join us soon for a birdwatching trip, you will love it!

info@thebiggesttwitch.com

For details of all our trips.


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