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Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch
Biggest Twitch

Visit to the Lek.  A pre-dawn start saw us take the short walk from the lodge up the Manu Road to the Cock-of-the-Rock Lek.  Even before we reached the viewing platform we could hear bizarre noises from the forest.  Stepping onto the platform, the lek was already under way with gaudy orange, black and gray male cock-of-the-rocks performing their ritual dances to attract the rather more subdued brown females.  We spent about an hour here enthralled by the fantastic spectacle being played out right in front of us.  We managed a few poor photos in the very low light which do not do justice to these incredible birds.
We returned to the lodge for a late breakfast and had our first daylight views of the beautiful gardens complete with bird tables and hummingbird feeders.  Eating breakfast was difficult as we were continually jumping up to admire the next bird at the feeders.
Our plan was to head back up the Manu Road for more birding but we only got as far as the entrance gate when we were engulfed in a huge feeding flock containing countless amazing birds.  It was an exhilarating experience to see so many birds of so many species so close.  It was also very frustrating as each of us called different birds in different directions.  You just didn’t know where to look next!  The colours were amazing as tanagers, flycatchers, euphonias, redstarts, dacnises and woodpeckers all vied for attention.
The rest of the day was spent birding the Manu Road above the lodge.  The undoubted highlight was a cryptically camouflaged bird, a rest for the eyes after the earlier riot of colour, an Andean Potoo.  This nightjar-like bird was spending the day roosting at the top of a dead secropia trunk and blended in beautifully.


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